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Patrick S.

Wellness & Cranial Stimulation

The feeling that you have exhausted all of your options. Have you ever felt this way? For many people who know that feeling, the search for alternatives almost becomes a life pursuit. This is a common feature among people who use alternative therapies. For Patrick, he went down a similar path. Medically discharged from his career as a medic in the military, Patrick found himself retired at a relatively young age. While in the process of building his house, he started to get panic attacks. Clinically, it could be classified as anxiety, depression, or even PTSD but for Patrick is was impacting his daily life. 

Over the course of four years, he tried various pharmaceutical treatments for either anxiety or depression. He tried traditional therapies with his psychiatrist, but nothing seemed to work. He even tried ECT sessions without success. “It was just day after day after day. It is doesn’t seem to stop.” Feeling like he had tried all of his clinical options, he started to look for other lifestyle modalities in the field of wellness. Diet and meditation seemed to help but they just didn’t get him to a sense of balance. “I just ran out of ideas,” he expressed about his search for balance and away from the roller coaster of anxiety and depression.

He was on Facebook one day and saw an advertisement for a device that uses pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMF). Patrick swore he would never buy anything on Facebook, but he felt compelled to click on this advertisement. PEMF is a therapy that has long had different forms over the decades but its history dates back to ancient eastern medicine in the use of magnetic fields. The technology used today takes the form of a home-use device that is non-invasive and worn as a headset. Patrick was not convinced this type of therapy could help him but he decided to learn more about PEMF.

To him, science is important so he looked into the scientific research on PEMF. He found nothing that raised the red flags about the therapy. With claims that it could help him with sleep, relaxation, and meditation, there was some potential with this therapy. He even discussed it with his psychiatrist. She was aware of PEMF and encouraged him to try it. As a device that can be purchased on-line, he was skeptical but the vendor offered a 60-day money-back guarantee and they accepted Paypal. He bought it.

Within 5 days, he saw results. He uses the device to help him with meditation. It seems to help him focus. After more use, Patrick started to see a change in his sleep patterns. Before using PEMF, he was a restless sleeper and would typically get three hours of sleep per night. Now, he is enjoying a full 8 hours per night. Today, he uses it twice per day along with meditation. He feels like he has some normalcy back in his life. For others in a similar situation, Patrick advises to “Do the research and find a good doctor who can help guide you.”

To learn more about neurotech devices and treatments related to wellness and human performance, visit our free directory.

Ray D.

Post-traumatic Stress (PTSD) & Chronic Pain

This veteran’s name and photo have been masked to protect his identity.

All too often neurological conditions are complex and there are combined conditions to treat for one person. This is a story of a veteran living with PTSD and chronic pain.

High altitude is high adrenaline for Ray, a retired Marine serving from 1997 to 2003 with two years in Iraq then Marine reserves until 2012. He was conducting reconnaissance missions that logged more than 300 jumps from airplanes at a high altitude. From that flight level, your thoughts revolve around the oxygen that you need at the time but not the real toll that jump is taking to your body upon landings. With over 560 parachute landings under his belt, Ray’s back and legs were damaged in the process. When he returned from the combat zone, he knew that he had mental health issues but pushed them aside for work. He found himself drinking and isolating himself and then turning to suicide to ease the pain. He was diagnosed with spinal disc damage and as a result lives with severe chronic pain.


It was not until 2009 did he finally seek help. The DAV (Disabled American Veterans) assisted him with his paperwork. When he finally received help, he was diagnosed with PTSD. He finds his network of fellow veterans helps him with his PTSD and he also volunteers for the veterans crisis line. In 2012, two major events happened in his life. His wife signed him up for the VA wheelchair games and after doing so she passed away. Still grieving from the loss of his wife, he attended the VA wheelchair games any way. He found that attending those games was the greatest gift his deceased wife could give him. He recognized that he is not alone and there are other veterans living with PTSD. Adaptive sports and, even more so, the competition helped him turn his life around. 


But even with adaptive sports, work, and volunteer duties, Ray still deals with chronic pain on a daily basis. He finds in the evenings when things settle from the day, he slips into symptoms of PTSD and he focuses on his pain. Both make it difficult for him to sleep. He tried many different treatments but just dealt with the pain. This scenario frequently happens with people living with multiple complex conditions. Treating clinicians tend to focus on one area rather than looking at how the various conditions can mask or magnify other conditions. In Ray’s case, he tries to live with the pain while addressing the symptoms of PTSD.


A novel neuromodulation device was introduced to him as a non-invasive high-frequency surface stimulation device. He agreed to try it for three months to see how it works. After one week, his response was “this thing is amazing.” With 6 slipped disks in his back, his pain ranges from his legs, back and arms. He wears the device for 4 hours per day which happens to be the life of its rechargeable battery.  “It feels like a vibration on the skin, like a deep massage,” Ray explains. The small adhesive patch with a smartwatch size processor is a wearable that recently came onto the market with FDA clearance. Ray wears it all day and can’t tell that he is wearing it. On first use, he feels pain relief within 10-15 minutes of turning the device on with a residual effect for about 24 hours. He feels like his pain levels have dropped by 20% within just one week of use. The device connects to a smartphone app allowing Ray to control the device including the levels of current going into his body with a range of 0 to 100 milliamps. He has tried TENS units before but this is nothing like a TENS. “There are no wires and it’s comfortable like a massage.”  Even his mother noticed a difference in Ray, she mentioned to him that he has been able to focus more than before. With his pain reduced, Ray’s mind can now concentrate on other things other than his pain.